Sunday, October 14, 2012

"Amur Maple" - Exploring Component Connections



Amur Maple Necklace
Sometimes, something outside is just so beautiful!  There is a little tree in my neighborhood, an Amur Maple, that has beautiful color each fall.  It's primary color is nearly indefinable.  Somewhere between cerise, claret, and burgundy, with hints of rust, and it has touches of creamy gold here and there.
Here's a closer look!

When I went the Gem and Lapidary Workers Show a couple weeks ago here in Minneapolis, I found at my favorite cabochon supplier, a "Cherry Creek Jasper" which reminded my of the glorious color in this tree.  I bought some ovals and tiny rounds and could not wait to play with them!

I have developed a passion for Miyuki 24k Gold Delicas.  I had some Dark Gold Rainbow, and they brought a beautiful bronzy rust to the color palette.  I bezeled everything and played around with embellishments.

I decided that I wanted to feature the beautiful stones, and also, wanted to continue playing with connections between components, with those shapes playing a starring role in the piece, so removed all the picots and began to connect the elements.


Oh, and one step back, when thinking about a neck strap, I remembered my "spoils of war." Going to "war" in the Battle of the Beadsmith brought an AWESOME set of dog tags to my home as a token of participation.  Along with the tags were some wonderful 6mm Czech brass tile beads.  I got them out and played with them until they looked a bit antique, and wove up two straps.  You can see the progression of my design, step by step from right to left, with a change in each generation, until the final one, which became the strap. Oh, those fantastic 6/0 beads are Czech too, I've been saving them for something special, and this seemed the right time!
 
 
I attached them to check the drape of my connections, and to be able to see how the strap and the focal piece worked together.  I am really interested in an airy look to my beadwork, and negative space that creates lovely shapes.  But once the strap was in place, I decided that some of the connections needed amplification to work effectively with the substantial strap.  So, with a stronger edge in mind...
 
The black background really helps focus the negative spaces and the improved relationship to the neck strap through the added connections at the edges and between strap and focal piece.
I am not going to list this piece in my Etsy shop right away, for two reasons.  First, I really like the thing, and maybe I don't want to sell it!  And secondly, I have to take good photos of many of my pieces for an upcoming project, and I don't want it to sell until I have it carefully archived.  So, on to the camera work!   One final glance, and then, off to clean my beading counter, and walk the doggie.  Happy beading to you!


.

25 comments:

  1. It's interesting how many ways there are to approach a project. Is there one element of the project that was a catalyst for the rest? Or maybe the influence of the natural world changing around you caused ideas to take shape. Thanks for giving me something to cogitate on and a vision of beauty. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You gave me something to think about too! I think this was many things coming together, the tree, the cabochons, my last two pieces and how I connected the the components in each to each other... just living life! :o)

      Delete
  2. That is beautiful. I have become quite fond of my Iris Delicas- which have a rose gold tone. They make everything so much richer.

    I had to scroll back and forth to see each of your connections and how you added to them.

    I struggle over neck straps. Mostly I struggle because I do not want to invest the extra time and add to something that is already going to be pricey, however, I feel something substantial is required. Your strap fits this piece beautifully.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I totally agree about neckstraps, BUT in this case, I needed something in proportion to the last little cab... or at least I THOUGHT I did. :o) Holy cow, you read really seriously. Thank you!

      Delete
  3. I love the way you show your work and the explanation is so enjoyable.
    Absolutely perfect jewelry,I love the design and the colors are just amazing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Amy. I don't write tutorials, so this is my means to share information with my community. :o)

      Delete
  4. Oh, Marsha, another stunner, indeed! I'm terribly smitten, as well, with Fall's glories and have gloried in them this year in our new locale. (In Florida, we had to accept Fall, Winter and Spring all at once, during a single 2-week period in February!) And I love the way you share your design insights - thanks for showing us this glorious work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Callie. I'm so glad you get to have seasons again! I know I would miss them!

      Delete
  5. Ahha! That's how you did the chain! I could not figure it out. I like when i can't figure out a design just by looking at the picture. Beautiful. You truly captured the essence of fall with this piece. Divine color combo!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Kinga! I'm very proud of my little chain. I'm so glad you like it!

      Delete
  6. I loved that you showed us this necklace in progress. I learn so much from your posts, and in this one I can see how, visually, the beadwoven chain balances out your splendid focal. I find the hardest part of beadweaving is designing the way the components connect to one another. It's really amazing the difference you made in the second take!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm so glad that comes through. I was thinking I should have done half and photographed it, but I needed to try it all out before I was convinced I had it right... :o)

      Delete
  7. What an inspiring piece of artwork! I love the intricacy, the depth of the colors and the way all the tones play off and yet compliment each other.
    Stunning!
    http://ceeceenativecrafts.blogspot.ca/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I visited your shiny new blog and look forward to seeing what you make!

      Delete
  8. This is so interesting and beautifully photographed. Keep these pictures up forever so we can all return again and again to see a thing of beauty being created.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for reading and for your generous words. I will keep the photos up as long as blogger cooperates with that plan!

      Delete